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Old 11-25-2012, 06:45 AM
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Default Stem cells develop best in 3D

Stem cells are responsible for tissue growth and tissue repair after injury. Therefore, the discovery that these vital cells grow better in a three-dimensional environment is important for the future treatment of disease with stem cell therapy.

"We can see that the quality of the cells produced two-dimensionally is not good enough. By putting the cells in a three-dimensional environment and giving them the proper growth conditions, we get much better results. Therefore we are developing a three-dimensional culture medium in gelatine in the laboratory to mimic the one inside an embryo," says Professor Anne Grapin-Botton from DanStem at the University of Copenhagen, who produced the results together with colleagues from Switzerland and Belgium.

The international research team hopes that the new knowledge about three-dimensional cell growth environments can make a significant contribution to the development of cell therapies for treating diabetes. In the long term this knowledge can also be used to develop stem cell treatments for chronic diseases in internal organs such as the liver or lungs. Like the pancreas, these organs are developed from stem cells in 3D.

From stem cells to specialised cells
The research team has investigated how the three-dimensional organisation of tissue in the early embryonic stage influences development from stem cells to more specialised cells.

"We can see that the pancreas looks like a beautiful little tree with branches. Stem cells along the branches need this structure to be able to create insulin-producing cells in the embryo. Our research suggests that in the laboratory beta cells can develop better from stem cells in 3D than if we try to get them to develop flat in a Petri dish," explains Professor Grapin-Botton.

"Attempts to develop functional beta cells in 2D have unfortunately most often resulted in poorly functioning cells. Our results from developing cells in 3D have yielded promising results and are therefore an important step on the way to developing cell therapies for treating diabetes."

The research is supported by the Novo Nordisk Foundation, Swiss National Research Foundation, and the National Institute of Health (NIH), USA.

The results from the paper "Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis" have just been published in the scientific journal Cell Reports.

Contact:
Professor Anne Grapin-Botton
Mobile phone: +45 29634398

Last edited by gdpawel : 11-25-2012 at 01:24 PM. Reason: post full article
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Old 11-25-2012, 01:22 PM
gdpawel gdpawel is offline
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Default New 3D Stem Cell Culture Method

The Journal Of Visualized Experiments Highlights New 3D Stem Cell Culture Method

Stem cells are the body's mechanics, repairing damaged tissues and organs. Because these cells are able to grow into any type of cell in the body, scientists believe they hold the key to groundbreaking new therapies. To help further this research, scientists from the University of Victoria have found a new way to culture cells in 3D - a significant step forward for regenerative medicine.

"Cells in your body grow and divide in a 3D environment, especially when you think of stem cells, which differentiate to become all the different types of cells in your body," said paper-author Dr. Stephanie Willerth. "Yet, a lot of work is still being done in a 2D environment."

Essentially, since your body is three-dimensional, it makes sense that stem cells do their best repair work in 3D as well. By growing these cells in 3D, researchers are better able to see how these cells behave in conditions that more closely resemble those in the body.

Though Dr. Willerth's lab specifically looks at repairing the spinal cord, she believes growing stem cells in 3D will be important for researchers in other fields as well, so she chose to publish her research in the Journal of Visualized Experiments.

"As the study of stem cells advances, it is necessary to create a culture system that more accurately represents the one cells grow in naturally," said JoVE Associate Editor, Meghan Berryman.

[url]http://www.jove.com/video/3641/preparation-of-3d-fibrin-scaffolds-for-stem-cell-culture-applications#

The Journal of Visualized Experiments

[url]http://cancerfocus.org/forum/showthread.php?t=3153
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