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Old 10-01-2010, 09:48 AM
Dross Dross is offline
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Default New lung cancer research finds half of advanced lung cancer patients receive chemothe

A new story entry has been added:

New lung cancer research finds half of advanced lung cancer patients receive chemotherapy

Quote:
For the first time to date, research published in the October edition of the [I]Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO)[/I] sought to determine the use of chemotherapy[URL="http://www.cancerfocus.org/taxonomy/term/29"]term[/URL] in a contemporary, diverse non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) population encompassing all patient ages. Prior population-based studies have shown that only 20 to 30 percent of advanced lung cancer patients receive chemotherapy treatment.
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Old 10-02-2010, 08:22 AM
gdpawel gdpawel is offline
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Default

And add to that, the June issue of Oncology News International (June 2010, V 19, No 6) quotes a Duke University study of the use of high-tech cancer imaging, with one representative finding being that the average Medicare lung cancer patient receives 11 radiographs, 6 CT scans, a PET scan, and MRI, two echocardiograms, and an ultrasound, all within two years of diagnosis. A study co-author (Dr. Kevan Schulman) asks: "Are all these imaging studies essential? Are they all of value? Is the information really meaningful? What is changing as a result of all this imaging?"

For one thing, clinical trials virtually always have time to disease progression as a primary endpoint. Without the imaging studies, one can't get accurate time to progression data. So these are tests performed for the benefit of drug companies seeking new drug approval, for clinical investigators seeking contracts and publications, and for clinicians seeking an easy way to make clinical decisions (and, occasionally, seeking income enhancement).
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Old 10-13-2010, 10:16 PM
gdpawel gdpawel is offline
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Default A changing trend in imaging studies?

Paul Levy is President and CEO of Beth Israel Deconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. He recently blogged on The Health Care Blog that recent trends in radiology imaging portend a dramatic and rapid reduction in this segment of a hospital's business plan. There has been a large reduction in the number of some types of imaging studies in hospitals.

The Chief of Radiology at Beth Israel summarized their experience which is common to other hospitals and provides some of the reasons.

The biggest hit has been in CT scans, the modality they most depend on for revenue. They are about 10% down in CT cases from last year, due to a combination of patient and physician fears about radiation exposure, more prudent ordering of studies by physicians, leakage out of the medical center, and the introduction of physician incentive programs (to minimize the amount of imaging) by some insurers.

Also, they have not seen an upswing in ultrasound or MRI to match the CT volume drop. and by the way, this occurred while their overall patient volume increased during the same period.

The result of these trends will be to reduce the number of radiologists working in hospitals, and there will also probably result in a reduction of salaries for this physician specialty.
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